Arnett beat MoBay United in Red Stripe Premier League

first_imgArnett Gardens FC registered a come-from-behind 2-1 victory against Montego Bay United (MBU) in the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) top of the table football match at Anthony Spaulding Sports Complex in Trench Town yesterday. Montego Bay took the lead when the RSPL’s leading marksman, Owayne Gordon, fired home his season high 16th goal past Arnett’s custodian, Peter Harrison, in the 21st minute. However, the home side fought back and scored twice inside two minutes. Kenniel Hyde swerved a kick from 25 yards past Romaine Bowers in goal for MBU in the 43rd minute. Then veteran striker Leon Strickland headed home in the 45th minute. MoBay United started well with some beautiful build-ups from Gordon, Dino Williams and Cory Hylton and took the lead when Williams threaded a perfect pass to Gordon, who finished off the play beautifully. However, Arnett gradually took over and scored two goals in the closing minutes of the first half for a good win that pushed them into second position on 57 points, three off leaders Portmore United (60) and ahead of MBU, on 54 points, in the race for the $1 million incentive awarded to the team that completes the preliminary stage of the league on most points. Two rounds remain. “I’m proud of the team coming from behind today (yesterday) to beat MoBay United. We also had some players out but the other players stepped up,” Jerome Waite, head coach of defending champions Arnett, told The Gleaner. The veteran coach was also confident that his team would retain the title. “We are here to retain the title,” he declared. On the other hand, MBU’s head coach, Paul ‘Tegat’ Davis who was also head coach at Arnett – had high praises for his team’s effort. “It was a pretty good game as we had seven players out. We went ahead and the players put out their best and now we will win the Premier League,” Davis, who is also a former national striker disclosed. Arnett Gardens 2 MoBay United 1 Boys’ Town 0 Humble Lion 1 Harbour View 1 FC Reno 1 Portmore United 1 Waterhouse 0 Rivoli United 0 Tivoli Gardens 1 UWI FC 1 Cavalier SC 0 Yesterday’s Resultslast_img read more

Instilling a love of reading

first_imgThe Maponya Mall Reading Programme willbe hosted mainly at the Funda UJabuleschool in Soweto. (Image: UJ) MEDIA CONTACTS • Herman Esterhuizen  UJ media relations  +27 559 36653 or +27 72 129 0777 RELATED ARTICLES: RELATED ARTICLES • UJ Soweto university open for learning • Tackling SA’s education challenges • SA prioritises quality education • Getting needy kids hooked on books • Primary schools get a helping handEmily van RijswijckA top shopping mall, a financial services company and a university have struck up a joint venture to teach children in Soweto the joy and educational value of reading, within and outside the classroom.The Maponya Mall Reading Programme, which targets children between the ages of four and eight, was formally launched at the mall in Klipspruit, Soweto, by the University of Johannesburg (UJ) and Sanlam.The upmarket shopping centre is close to UJ’s Soweto campus.According to the university, the aim of the programme is two-fold – firstly to promote reading and an appreciation of literature through storytelling and secondly, to give staff and students of the Faculty of Education the chance to share their storytelling skills with the surrounding community.The Dean of the Faculty of Education, Prof Sarah Gravett, and B Ed Foundation Phase teacher education students got the programme going by reading to about 250 children throughout the morning of 17 March, the launch date.According to Gravett, reading lays the foundation for all further cognitive development in young children and it is critical that parents read to their children and, in so doing, stimulate a passion for literature which will stay with them all their lives.“Reading is a very important way of activating and initiating the development of more complex thinking and linguistic literacy, which can prove crucial to the years of foundation phase schooling,” she says. “The earlier reading is used as a tool to stimulate language development the better, since we never exist without language; we use it all the time.”The Funda UJabule schoolThe programme will be hosted for the most part at the unique Funda UJabule (isiZulu, meaning “learn and be happy”) school on UJ’s Soweto campus. Funda UJabule, a partnership between the Gauteng Department of Education and UJ, is used as a teacher education and research facility for students planning to teach at pre-primary level.Foundation phase students at UJ participate in classroom activities at the school and spend time as observers and assistants to the teachers.“The overall aim is to establish a strong teacher education programme that bridges the ‘theory-practice divide’,” says UJ.In an effort to reach the community, teachers and students contribute a bi-weekly column to community newspapers in Soweto in which they discuss child care and aspects of education.Funda UJabule opened its doors in 2010, with two grade R (foundation phase or pre-school) classes offering education to 200 children in either English and isiZulu, or English and Sesotho. In time it is hoped to develop the school into a fully-fledged primary school.In addition, Funda UJabule is a facility where students can undertake research in various related fields.The school hosts a number of community engagement projects related to care and education in childhood, of which the Maponya Mall Reading Programme is the latest. Teaching parentsThe reading programme also has a strong parenting focus. In the coming months the UJ Faculty of Education will host further events, some of which will train parents in the art of storytelling and help them with reading strategies at home.Books are about more than stories and should be used as tools by parents to teach their children. The choice of a particular story can set an entire learning process in motion, Gravett believes.“The question should not be whether I should be reading to my child, but what I should be reading and how I can use the reading experience to teach my child something about society,” she says.“Even though reading is important for the development of linguistic literacy it should be accompanied by the deliberate attempt to teach one’s child something new. Your child’s success at school depends on what you are reading to them.”Metropolitan RaucalThis is not the first time UJ has joined forces with a financial institution to promote education and learning. In 1994 the university went into a partnership with Metropolitan Life to support the Metropolitan Raucal, a Gauteng Department of Education school established in 1992 by the then Rand Afrikaans University (since renamed as the University of Johannesburg).The initial aim of the school was to help township pupils with an aptitude for mathematics and science to gain access to quality education. Now in its 20thyear, the school continues to post excellent matric results and, while its curriculum remains strongly focused on quality maths and science education, the selection criteria have become less restrictive.  The school maintained a 100% matriculation pass rate until 2009 but faltered a little, with one failure in each of the 2010 and 2011 academic years.A rich historyWith its rich, chequered and sometimes violent history it is no wonder that the sprawling township of Soweto (its name taken from the first two letters of the words in South Western Township) is such a drawcard for visitors to Gauteng and is one of the top ten destinations in the province.South Africa’s biggest township has written its name firmly in the history books for a number of reasons.It was here that the Freedom Charter was signed in 1955 in Soweto’s oldest suburb, Kliptown. It is also here that visitors can see the only street in the world where two Nobel Peace Prize laureates once lived.Former president Nelson Mandela and Archbishop Desmond Tutu both lived in Vilakazi Street in Orlando West and while Tutu’s former house is still a domestic residence Mandela’s small matchbox home has been turned into a museum.Soweto is also the place where the 1976 student uprising began, an event that sounded the death knell for apartheid and led to severe international sanctions against the country right through the 1980s.The Hector Pietersen Museum around the corner from Mandela’s old home commemorates this event.last_img read more

PROJECT GeoGames 2012 – A Lackey’s Journey

first_img SharePrint RelatedGroundspeak Weekly Newsletter – March 7, 2012March 8, 2012In “Groundspeak’s Weekly Newsletter”GeoWoodstock IX 2011 – A Lackey Report from PennsylvaniaAugust 19, 2011In “Community”Two Mega-Events in One WeekendAugust 21, 2012In “Community” A Mega-Event with a 20-story zip-lineGroundspeak Lackeys are traveling thousands of miles from H.Q. throughout the year to share smiles, shake hands, and make geocaching memories at nearly 20 Mega-Events worldwide. Ben Field aka, LackeyBenno, attended the Mega-Event PROJECT: GeoGames 2012 (GC32012). It took place in Leipzig, Germany. Ben has been a Lackey since 2008 and works in IT. Here’s Ben’s account of his adventure.Written by: Ben FieldLackey Ben “LackeyBenno”As I read through the descriptions of the games being hosted at the Geogames Mega-Event in Leipzig, I had two questions running through my head:  How many of these games should I actually attempt and what exactly IS a PETling???  The answer to the first question took a few hours to figure out, the second one was answered relatively quickly.  A PETling is a small plastic preform for a 2-liter bottle. The clear water-tight containers are frequently used as geocaches in Germany. The PEtlings were the focus of three of the GeoGames I was about to attempt.The day leading up to the event I managed to take the tram with Jeremy, the Co-Founder and CEO of Geocaching.com, to grab a few caches and explore downtown Leipzig.  I’d already seen a small amount of the downtown area having come down the night before to watch Deutschland’s agonizing defeat in the Eurocup semi-finals, but wasn’t about to pass up more opportunities to explore.PETlingThere was an added layer of difficulty finding some of the caches with our limited knowledge of German.  After looking for one cache in the wrong area for a lengthy period of time, some nearby geocachers helped us out by explaining that the name of the cache we were looking for translated to “old town hall”, which happened to be the building across the street from where we were searching.  We had no trouble logging the find once we had what should have been an obvious giveaway.Between caches, we also managed to explore the Bach museum, which held some fascinating pieces of history. The museum was positioned next to the site of the Thomasschule, where Bach taught students and composed during the latter part of his life.After a great meal at Romanushof on Katharinenstraße, and a gracious ride back to the Messegelände from cachers Manuela and Peter (Schulze&Schultze) but better known by the name of their geocaching and dining blog “Schlemmercacher“, we prepared for the opening party.  While Jeremy was busy preparing a speech, I represented the US in the opening parade with only Signal at my side.  Thankfully, Caro (saxony) was gracious enough to hold the sign for us as we marched through the masses of people gathered for the event.Dosenfischer in concertStill feeling some effects of a cold, I wasn’t feeling overly adventurous the next day, but I was too excited for the event to let the cold hold me down.  Enjoying the PETling toss first, my enthusiasm grew. By the time the 6:00pm cutoff arrived, I’d made it through all of the games. My new geocaching friend Jana (tkrholic) kept me moving, determined to complete all of the games and keep me company throughout the day.The games weren’t the only activities at the event. There was ample time during the day to take photos of Jeremy descending the Trau Dich (zip line – see the photo at top) from the top of the 75M high tower.  Later in the evening, it was time to take in the geocaching band Dosenfischer and mingle with the masses of geocachers as a thunderstorm passed by.  All in all, it was a fantastic day.We found time the next day to explore some areas of Leipzig with Andy (stash-lab) and Nils (Nilos).  A trip to the Völkerschlachtdenkmal monument commemorating the German victory over the French at the Battle of the Nations was a worthwhile glimpse at the history of the location. After snagging the correspondingly named cache, we stumbled upon some other cachers, including ORaMo and Rennrodler. They graciously shared some personalized swag with us.  Before heading out, there was still time to snag a few more caches including Connex and then Gleis 26 – Reloaded at the train station.  It was a great day to end a great trip.Ben (far left) at the Völkerschlachtdenkmal Monument with Jeremy (center) and geocachersShare with your Friends:Morelast_img read more

The Uneven Burden of Energy Costs

first_imgEnergy efficiency can ease hardships and benefit everyoneWhile the energy burden numbers are alarming, opportunities abound to ease the hardship on groups that have long been underserved by efficiency programs.While many utilities operate energy-efficiency programs, as the report notes, much more can be done to reduce the energy burden on low-income households, including targeting efficiency initiatives to the long-overlooked low-income multifamily sector. One earlier study by Energy Efficiency for All found that increasing energy efficiency in multifamily affordable housing could cut electricity usage by as much as 26%.Utilities can step up efforts to reach out to low-income households, such as offering financing for energy efficiency projects. Another opportunity is EPA’s Clean Energy Incentive Program, an element of the Clean Power Plan to limit carbon pollution from power plants. It rewards states for early investments in energy efficiency in low-income communities.Bringing low-income housing to the efficiency level of the average U.S. home would eliminate 35% of the energy burden experienced by this population, the study’s authors found. The potential is even higher for African-American (42%), Latino (68%), and renting households (97%).The 56-page report, coming at a critical time in the debate over climate change, is a valuable tool in guiding policy makers on where to target energy-efficiency investment. Those are real — and critical — dollars. The average family could save as much as $300 annually on utility bills.Energy efficiency has long been an NRDC priority because it is the cheapest and fastest way to reduce power-plant pollution that harms our health and contributes to climate change.Cutting energy waste benefits all of us — in cleaner air, a more reliable transmission grid, and a stronger economy. (Efficiency initiatives not only generate jobs, such as work installing insulation, but also save utility customers money they can spend for other goods.) In addition, when low-income households can’t pay their utility bills, it can lead to higher costs for all utility customers.This report should be on the reading list of utilities, energy regulators, and anyone else looking to make the electric grid cleaner, more affordable, and more reliable.It won’t be just underserved households that benefit from greater investment in energy efficiency. It will be all of us. Meanwhile, Memphis had the highest energy burden for low-income households, with residents spending, on average, 13.2% of their income for energy. The median annual income for low-income residents of Memphis is $19,157, meaning that a family would be paying a whopping $200 a month ($2,400 a year) for energy to keep the lights on and their homes comfortable.In fact, in 17 of the cities in the report, a fourth of low-income households experienced an energy burden greater than 14%.Low-income households in the Southeast and Midwest, while having among the lowest average energy prices, had the highest average metropolitan energy burdens. While this report did not establish a causative relationship, we do know that Southeastern utilities have the lowest investment in energy-efficiency programs when compared to other regions. A new study confirms that low-income households, households of color, multifamily households, and renting households spend a much larger percentage of their income on energy bills than the average family, providing new evidence of the urgent need to expand energy-efficiency programs to vulnerable communities.The report, Lifting the High Energy Burdens in America’s Largest Cities: How Energy Efficiency Can Improve Low-Income and Underserved Communities, offers new insight into the hardships faced by urban low-income households — including African-American and Latino households and renters in multifamily buildings — all of whom pay a disproportionate amount of their income for energy.The study by the Energy Efficiency for All project (a coalition which includes NRDC and the American Council for an Energy-Efficiency Economy) highlights the energy burdens on families in 48 large U.S. cities. It casts a spotlight on the opportunities to use efficiency to reduce these burdens, while cutting power-plant pollution that drives dangerous climate change. Why this report mattersPoverty and discrimination in rental and housing markets drive low-income households and people of color into older, less efficient buildings with higher energy costs. (Property owners may not install the best energy-saving measures and appliances because the owners are not paying the utility bills.)High energy burdens and poor housing quality then contribute to health problems: poorly heated or cooled homes contribute to asthma, respiratory problems, heart disease, arthritis, and rheumatism. Families struggling to pay energy bills may sacrifice nutrition, medicine, and other necessities, which compound the effects of inequality.These issues are particularly acute for low-income multifamily households. Because they are largely underserved by existing energy-efficiency programs, the average low-income multifamily household has an energy burden more than three times higher than that of the average non-low-income multifamily household (5.0% and 1.5%, respectively) and had higher utility cost per square foot. In these homes, “energy expenditures run 37% higher per square foot than in owner-occupied multifamily units (i.e. condos or cooperatives), 41% higher than in renter-occupied single family detached units, and 76% higher than in owner-occupied single-family detached units.” Further, from 2001 to 2009, while average rents in multifamily housing increased by 7.5%, energy cost for these renters increased by nearly 23%.The picture is also shown regionally. Findings from the study show that low-income multifamily housing represented the second highest energy burden (second to low-income in aggregate) in every region of the nation except California and the Midwest.This is important because multifamily buildings represent approximately 25% of the housing units in the U.S. and comprise 20% of energy consumed by all housing, and more than half of all low-income families live in multifamily housing.Despite these facts, low-income multifamily buildings are largely underinvested by energy efficiency programs and represents a large untapped resource potential. Energy burdens are not equalThe big picture findings from the report: The overwhelming majority of single-family and multifamily low-income households (those with income at or below 80 percent of area median income), households of color, and renting households experienced higher energy burdens than the average household in the same metropolitan area.For example, low-income households — many of whom live in older housing with poor ventilation as well as aging, inefficient appliances and heating systems — spend, on average, 7.2% of their income on utility bills, which amounts to about $1,700 annually out of $25,000 in median household income. That is more than triple the 2.3% spent by higher-income households for electricity, heating, and cooling.African-American households experience a median energy burden 64% greater than white households (5.4% and 3.3%, respectively), and Latino households had a median burden 24% greater than white households (4.1% and 3.3%, respectively).center_img Solving Energy Poverty Unlocking the High Value of Clean Energy in Low-Income CommunitiesLow-Income Housing: Problems and SolutionsA Forgotten Tool to Solve the Housing Crisis Can Low-Income Housing Be Energy-Efficient and Affordable?How to Improve Energy-Efficiency ProgramsWeatherization’s Home-Stretch RecoveryEnergy Efficiency Costs Less Than New GenerationIs Weatherization Cost-Effective? RELATED ARTICLES Khalil Shahyd is a project manager with the National Resources Defense Council whose work focuses on the Energy Efficiency for All Project. He also promotes the expansion of green communities in New Orleans. This post originally appeared on the NRDC Expert Blog.last_img read more