Gaskin highlights the importance of agricultural sector

first_imgWith the oil and gas industry paving the way for Guyana’s development, Business Minister Dominic Gaskin has reiterated the importance of other sectors in the country’s economy, primarily the agricultural and agro-processing sectors.This announcement was made at the launch of Marketplace Uncapped, an exhibition aimed at promoting the products of local manufacturers in Guyana.During his address, Minister Gaskin stressed on the significance of understanding how greatly the agricultural sector affected the country and the opportunities that were possible from Guyana’s growing agro-processing industry.“It’s important to note that our government sees the agricultural and agro-processing sector as priority sectors, because we too understand that long after the oil has been extracted and there’s no more left, we still need to eat and feed others,” he stated.Some of the locally-manufactured productsCurrently, the Guyana Marketing Corporation (GMC) is working with small-scale manufacturers to highlight their businesses. While the use of quality ingredients is a requirement, packaging also plays an important role in gaining the customers’ attention. As such, Gaskin encouraged local producers to have their items featured at exhibitions to improve in these areas.The Minister revealed, “Our job is not to criticise those whose packaging is not that attractive, but to help them appreciate the need to not only compete on the basis of your ingredients, but on how well you package and how attractive your product is – when it is lined up on the supermarket shelf next to imported products and other products.”“We’re also trying to help smaller producers who don’t yet understand the benefit of packaging, ensuring that their goods are properly packaged and labelled,” he said.While adding that employment was created for farmers by small business ventures, Gaskin also emphasised the fact that Guyana’s import bill has been reduced, stating: “All these things are good for farmers, because we know that we import these foods. Every year, there is a high import bill that we have to face and if we can produce them locally and process them locally and make them available for local consumption, then we’re ahead of the game.”During his remarks, Minister Gaskin also touched on the fact that Guyana no longer exported catfish to the United States of America (USA). This is in light of the non-compliance with the United States Food Safety Modernisation Act, which he thinks should be fulfilled urgently. The Guyana Manufacturing and Services Association (GMSA) is collaborating with the University of Hawaii on educational programmes, which will assist with compliance on these requirements.“It doesn’t help us to sit down and attributing blame to each other. What we need to figure out: what needs to be done, what are the requirements, how can we help each other to achieve these requirements,” he stated.Presently, the Agriculture Ministry has embarked on a sustainable agricultural plan, which is financed through a US$15 million loan from the Inter-American Development Bank and is expected to impact the agricultural sector in a tremendous way. Spices such as turmeric and black pepper are also being cultivated in various areas in Region One (Barima-Waini). Additionally, the Business Ministry is working on two incubators, in Berbice and Lethem, which will assist small operators.While these are all systems that were put in place to diversify and develop the country’s agro-processing industry, the Business Minister, in his final comments, highlighted that for the sector to emerge victorious, consumers must patronise these businesses and buy the products, which are no less of good quality than imported products.last_img read more

Russia hosts World Cup in heat of battle with West

first_imgThat choice is possibly only more controversial today.The years since have seen Moscow clash with the West over everything from Syria and Ukraine to the poisoning of a former Russian double agent in England.Russia was even banned as a country from this winter’s Pyeongchang Olympics after being accused of state-sponsored doping at the Sochi Games it hosted four year earlier.The diplomatic barbs have been laced with Cold War-era venom and accompanied by the largest expulsion of diplomats in history.Yet Vladimir Putin is riding as high today as he was eight years ago.The former KGB spy’s popularity with Russians remains unshakeable and his presence on the international arena is more dominant than when he first came to power in 2000.The scandals and diplomatic wrangles have failed to generate a repeat of the boycott that saw nearly half the world stay away from the 1980 Moscow Olympics over the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.And Putin will have the chance to wield the “soft power” afforded by the football showpiece to project himself as a man of domestic achievement and global bearing.– ‘White elephants’ –Yet the tournament also comes riddled with peril for Putin.Russia has spent in excess of $13 billion (11 billion euros) — a World Cup record — on giving many of the 11 host cities their first post-Soviet facelifts.Fans attending matches in the Mordovia Arena in Saransk will be treading far off the tourist trial © AFP/File / Mladen ANTONOVHost city Saransk, for example, is best known for being the capital of a deserted region where Russia has set up female penal colonies.Airports were rebuilt and expanded to accommodate crowds whose size Russia may not see again for some time.Sleek hotels have gone up in places tourists rarely venture.Twelve voluminous stadiums now loom over cities in the European part of Russia after being completed in the nick of time.A part of Putin’s legacy will hinge on what happens to it all when the fans go home.The $50 billion believed to have been spent on the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi has had mixed results.The Black Sea resort city looks modern and feels electric. Residents whizz around on silky smooth roads and travel in style from a comfortable airport and train station.But the surrounding mountains that hosted the snow events are filled with abandoned hotels and FIFA will want to avoid such “white elephants”.Seeing the World Cup transform other cities into what Sochi itself has become will be a monumental achievement that could unlock Russia’s economic potential.Filling them with prestigious buildings no one ever uses will turn into another expensive mistake.– Monkey chants –Fans themselves will care little about the politics. Their main concern will be safely and swiftly getting to stadiums for the matches.Those who plan to follow their team as they criss-cross from one venue to the next will be confronted with Russia’s sheer scale.The 2,500 kilometres (1,500 miles) spanning the westernmost stadium in Kaliningrad and easterly one in Yekaterinburg translates into the distance between Moscow and London.Host cities are four time zones apart and compare best to the travel teams and fans had to endure in the 1994 World Cup in the United States.Foreigners will be further burdened by having to register with the police within a day of arriving in each new location.Some will also be fearful of Russia’s history of hooliganism and racist abuse that has marred a string of recent matches.Putin’s security services cracked down hard on football troublemakers to ensure there is no repeat of the battles that broke out between Russian and English fans at Euro 2016 in France.And football anti-discrimination chief Alexei Smertin has spent the past year trying to eradicate racist behaviour in stadiums.“We need to introduce personal responsibility so that fans who violate rules start being denied the right to go to stadiums and support their teams,” he said after more monkey chants rang out last month.– Gutsy football –FIFA boss Gianni Infantino wore a big grin in Sochi last week as he congratulated Putin for all Russia had already achieved.“You are working to make this World Cup the best World Cup ever,” Infantino said.Yet the chances of Putin celebrating many Russian triumphs on the pitch remain marginal. The host nation are the tournament’s second-lowest ranked team and have not won any of their last five matches.Putin is a sports fanatic who will be present when Russia face Saudi Arabia — the one nation at the World Cup ranked below them — at Moscow’s Luzhniki Stadium on June 14.Russia will attempt to make the knockout stage of a major tournament for the first time in 10 years and have a relatively easy group.But coach Stanislav Cherchesov has nowhere near the class of players of the likes of Portugal’s Cristiano Ronaldo or Brazil’s Neymar — only goalkeeper Igor Akinfeev is a name known abroad.Yet Putin spelled out clearly that he expected something special from the Russians at their first home World Cup.“They must show gutsy, uncompromising football, one which the fans love,” the president said in Sochi.0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today) 0Shares0000Russian President Vladimir Putin, pictured with FIFA president Gianni Infantino, has spent $13 billion on hosting the World Cup © SPUTNIK/AFP/File / Alexey NIKOLSKYMOSCOW, Russian Federation, May 13 – The World Cup kicks off in Russia in a month’s time with the hosts at loggerheads with the West and intent on using the football showpiece to trumpet their superpower status.Russia was a controversial choice when it was handed the rights to the world’s most watched event in a 2010 vote now tainted by bribery charges.last_img read more