Arnett beat MoBay United in Red Stripe Premier League

first_imgArnett Gardens FC registered a come-from-behind 2-1 victory against Montego Bay United (MBU) in the Red Stripe Premier League (RSPL) top of the table football match at Anthony Spaulding Sports Complex in Trench Town yesterday. Montego Bay took the lead when the RSPL’s leading marksman, Owayne Gordon, fired home his season high 16th goal past Arnett’s custodian, Peter Harrison, in the 21st minute. However, the home side fought back and scored twice inside two minutes. Kenniel Hyde swerved a kick from 25 yards past Romaine Bowers in goal for MBU in the 43rd minute. Then veteran striker Leon Strickland headed home in the 45th minute. MoBay United started well with some beautiful build-ups from Gordon, Dino Williams and Cory Hylton and took the lead when Williams threaded a perfect pass to Gordon, who finished off the play beautifully. However, Arnett gradually took over and scored two goals in the closing minutes of the first half for a good win that pushed them into second position on 57 points, three off leaders Portmore United (60) and ahead of MBU, on 54 points, in the race for the $1 million incentive awarded to the team that completes the preliminary stage of the league on most points. Two rounds remain. “I’m proud of the team coming from behind today (yesterday) to beat MoBay United. We also had some players out but the other players stepped up,” Jerome Waite, head coach of defending champions Arnett, told The Gleaner. The veteran coach was also confident that his team would retain the title. “We are here to retain the title,” he declared. On the other hand, MBU’s head coach, Paul ‘Tegat’ Davis who was also head coach at Arnett – had high praises for his team’s effort. “It was a pretty good game as we had seven players out. We went ahead and the players put out their best and now we will win the Premier League,” Davis, who is also a former national striker disclosed. Arnett Gardens 2 MoBay United 1 Boys’ Town 0 Humble Lion 1 Harbour View 1 FC Reno 1 Portmore United 1 Waterhouse 0 Rivoli United 0 Tivoli Gardens 1 UWI FC 1 Cavalier SC 0 Yesterday’s Resultslast_img read more

SEALs emerging from shadows to recruit

first_img Every SEAL must finish one of the world’s toughest entrance exams, a six-month training program that typically weeds out three of every four candidates. The Navy also is creating a SEAL rating – a formal job description – that should allow candidates to more quickly begin formal SEAL training. Previously, SEALs – the name stands for Sea, Air, Land – had to attend school to learn traditional jobs held by Navy sailors. 160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! CORONADO, Calif. – The Navy SEALs prefer to operate in the shadows, but the Pentagon’s need to increase the ranks of the elite terrorist-hunting commando force is prompting an unusually splashy recruiting effort. Navy SEAL Mitchell Hall, who won a Bronze Star in 2001 in Afghanistan, hopes to use the upcoming Ironman Triathlon in Hawaii to spread the word about the need for more recruits. The competition will make the 31-year-old chief petty officer a spokesman for the community of self-described quiet professionals and put him in front of the cameras he spent years avoiding. The change in recruiting methods comes amid the Pentagon’s increasing reliance on special operations and the call for a 15 percent increase in SEALs over the next several years. AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREWalnut’s Malik Khouzam voted Southern California Boys Athlete of the Week The SEALs have a legendary reputation as an elite, highly skilled fighting force, but it is hard to find candidates with the necessary physical conditioning. Just to get a chance to try out, SEAL recruits must swim 500 yards, then breeze through a series of push-ups, sit-ups and pull-ups and run 1.5 miles – all within strict time limits. This year, 500 of the 823 SEAL recruits – or 60 percent – failed the test in the first days of boot camp. “We can’t survive on that any longer,” said Master Chief Petty Officer Andy Tafelski, 51, who has a key role in the recruiting effort. “The pipeline has to become more efficient.” For the SEALs, who consider themselves the best of the best, lowering their standards is out of the question. To boost the SEALs’ ranks, the Navy is also working with recruiters to begin testing potential SEALs before they get to boot camp and making sure they have the physical skills. Mentors will work with those who qualify to prepare them for what comes next. last_img read more