The Institute of Tourism organizes a panel discussion “The impact of tourism on the Croatian economy”

first_imgThe Institute for Tourism and the Napredak Cultural Center are organizing a discussion on tourism on the topic “The impact of tourism on the Croatian economy”The discussions are intended for the general professional public, the media and anyone who wants to learn more about the impact of tourism on the economy. All guests will be able to participate in the Discussions by asking questions to the participants of the round table and an open constructive discussion.After the introductory speech of Dr. sc. Ivan Kožić, research associate at the Institute for Tourism, will be followed by a round table with the following participants: Dr. sc. Maroje Lang, Chief Advisor in the Research Department of the Croatian National Bank, Assoc. prof. dr. sc. Oliver Kesar, Professor at the Department of Tourism, Faculty of Economics, University of Zagreb, Dr. sc. Marina Tkalec, research associate at the Institute of Economics and Dr. sc. Neven Ivandić, senior research associate at the Institute of Tourism. The discussions will be led by Đuro Tomljenović.Participants will discuss the following topics:Measuring the impact of tourism on gross domestic product / (How is the share of tourism in GDP calculated correctly?)The size of tourism in the gross domestic product of Croatia / (Are the media interpretations of the share of tourism in Croatian GDP correct?)The impact of tourism on employment in Croatia / (What has the development of tourism brought to the Croatian labor market?)Opportunity cost of tourismcockdevelopment / (Would the Croatian economy be more successful without tourism?)The hearings will be held in the premises of the Napredak Cultural Center in Zagreb, Bogovićeva 1 (1st floor), on Friday, April 20, 2018, starting at 14.00 p.m. The estimated duration of the hearings is from 14.00 to 16.00, followed by informal gatherings with coffee and cakes. The Institute for Tourism invites all interested parties to confirm their arrival by e-mail: bozica.tosic@iztzg.hr.Join voice thinking and constructive and argumentative discussion, because only in this way can we grow and develop as individuals and as a society.RELATED NEWS:  DOWNLOAD THE COMPLETE SURVEY ATTITUDES AND TOURIST CONSUMPTION IN CROATIA – TOMAS SUMMER 2017</p>
<p><a href=”https://bs.serving-sys.com/BurstingPipe/adServer.bs?cn=brd&FlightID=24629406&Page=&PluID=0&Pos=904387822″ target=”_blank”><img src=”https://bs.serving-sys.com/BurstingPipe/adServer.bs?cn=bsr&FlightID=24629406&Page=&PluID=0&Pos=904387822″ border=0 width=1280 height=500></a></p>
<p>last_img read more

Spring break program boosts fundraising efforts

first_imgReacting to the stalled economy, the Alternative Winter and Spring Break programs are giving students more choices in domestic destinations for the service trips and helping them find creative ways to fund their trips.Though the number of participants in Alternative Winter and Spring Break programs remains the same as last year, more students than ever are asking about scholarship opportunities, payment options and fundraising, according to Melissa Gaeke, director of Alternative Spring Break.Gaeke said the Alternative Winter and Spring Break programs are doing their best to accommodate possible participants who are concerned about the cost of the trips in order to ensure a successful spring break for all who are interested.Already, Gaeke said, fundraising efforts have increased.“We are doing a lot more fundraising this year. The fundraising has been done through places like California Pizza Kitchen, 21 Choices and Yogurtland,” said Gaeke. “We’re trying any way to reduce the cost as much as possible for the students and their families.”To keep costs down, Alternative Spring Break is also boosting the number of local options offered. Gaeke hopes these local destinations will be more affordable choices for those who think the international service programs are too costly.Though international programs can cost anywhere from $915 to $2,500, domestic programs range from free trips to ones costing $800.Alice Hyun, a freshman majoring in business administration, said the new Alternative Spring Break options are a better fit for her budget.“If cost were not a problem at all, I would have applied to go to an international site, Guatemala, but I’m going to have to apply to a domestic site instead,” Hyun said. “Even though cost is an issue, I still want to do something productive with my spring break.”Some of the new, domestic programs include a civic leadership program in Atlanta and a program on Catalina Island in partnership with the Wrigley Institute.Despite the fundraising and increase in domestic destinations, some students still find Alternative Break programs too costly.“I was considering doing alternative spring break, but extra fundraising can only go so far,” said Ravi Mahesh, a sophomore majoring in economics. “I’m really sad that I can’t do one of the volunteer programs. I’ll probably end up volunteering somewhere closer to home where the costs are less expensive instead.”Though some students have chosen not to apply, Gaeke emphasized that interest is still strong because people still want to serve the community and to travel.“The reason students are applying isn’t different,” Gaeke said. “More and more students recognize these are interesting opportunities, want to travel and see parts of the world or the country other than road-tripping with their friends, and learn more about themselves through community service.”last_img read more