Thangavelu Mariyappan returns home to heros welcome

first_imgChennai, Sep 23 (PTI) Thangavelu Mariyappan, who won a gold medal at the Paralympics in Rio de Janeiro, returned home to a heros welcome here today. Tamil Nadu Ministers for School Education, Sports and Youth Welfare, K Pandiarajan, Rural Industries Minister P Benjamin along with several senior government officials received Mariyappan at the airport here, officials said. Mariyappan, hailing from Periyavadagampatti village near Salem in western Tamil Nadu, won the gold in the T-42 High Jump event with a best effort of 1.89m, leaving behind world champion Sam Grewe of the USA, who registered 1.86 m. The T-42 classification is for athletes with lower limb deficiency, leg length difference, impaired muscle power or impaired range of movement. Mariyappan, who was five when his right leg was crushed by a speeding bus, joined Murlikant Petkar (1972, swimming) and Devendra Jhajharia (2004, javelin throw) in the Indian Paralympics gold club. Hailing his feat, Chief Minister Jayalalithaa had announced a cash prize of Rs. 2 crore for Mariyappan. PTI CORR VIJ VS AH PDSlast_img read more

KOTC Orders Three Gas Carriers from HHI

first_imgKuwait Oil Tanker Company (KOTC) has signed today a contract with South Korean shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries (HHI) for three very large gas carries (VLGC).The three 84,000 cbm LPG carriers are expected to start delivery in 2019.The deal is said to be worth USD 213.3 million, KUNA news agency reported, with KOTC paying around USD 71 million per ship.The order is part of KOTC’s fleet renewal plan.Based on its website data, KOTC currently has a fleet of 28 ships, comprising 12 very large crude carriers (VLCC), ten product carriers, four LPG carriers and two bunker vessels.The contract signing comes as HHI reveals a 52 percent increase in value of new shipbuilding orders in 2017 when compared to the figures from the previous year.However, it should be noted that the 2016 baseline was pretty low taking into account that the year was very difficult for the shipbuilding industry due to low ordering activity.World Maritime News Stafflast_img read more

Good Shepherd Catholic Schools Ukulele Benefit Concert

first_img Posted: May 22, 2019 SAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Good Shepherd Catholic School will have their 9th Annual Ukulele Benefit Concert to raise money for the San Diego Humane Society.3rd graders will perform several songs on Friday, May 24 at 6:30 p.m. May 22, 2019 KUSI Newsroom The Good Shepherd Catholic School has their 9th Annual Ukulele concert this Friday at 6:30pm to raise money for the @sdhumane Get a sneak peak on @KUSI_GMSD @KUSINews pic.twitter.com/a7mrGJm9Xm— Allie Wagner (@alliewagnertv) May 22, 2019center_img Good Shepherd Catholic School’s Ukulele Benefit Concert KUSI Newsroom, Categories: Entertainment, Good Morning San Diego, Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img

Brandon Victor Dixon On Jesus Christ Superstar John Legend We Are New

first_imgJudas from “Jesus Christ Superstar Live In Concert” opens up about working on one of the year’s most-lauded TV specials and his new platform to marry music with making a differenceNate HertweckGRAMMYs May 11, 2018 – 5:22 am When “Jesus Christ Superstar Live In Concert” aired on April 1, fans of both the classic Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice musical and its modern all-star cast rejoiced. While viewers recognized the marquee recording artists who appeared, for many it was Judas who stole the show. The man behind that role? Brandon Victor Dixon, an accomplished actor and two-time Tony and GRAMMY nominee who has just released his first single, the uplifting and unifying “We Are.”Originally from Washington, D.C., Dixon has performed on Broadway in “The Color Purple” and “Hamilton,” on television in “One Life To Live” and “Law & Order,” and on stages from Los Angeles to New York to London. A true Renaissance man, Dixon formed his own production company two years ago to develop film and TV content. But his arrival as a recording artist is anything other than your typical stage-to-stereo crossover, and “We Are” is much more than a mere single.”I’m not necessarily building a recording career,” says Dixon. “I’m a very philanthropically oriented individual. There are a lot of causes that I support, and I’m a big fan of advocacy. In this day and age, I feel like if you’re not advocating for somebody or something then you have to ask yourself what you’re doing. I feel like the more we speak for and support others, the less we’ll have to worry about speaking for and supporting ourselves.”To that end, “We Are” represents a message of equality and compassion Dixon hopes to share with the world. The song originated when fellow actor Daniel J. Watts asked Dixon to write something to go along with a performance he was doing at a benefit event. Dixon crafted the hook and the rest fell into place with the help of South African producer Greg Dean Borowsky.Next, Dixon walked the walk and chose Young New Yorkers, an organization aimed at enrolling sentenced juveniles in arts programs instead of sending them to jail, as the beneficiary of the single’s proceeds.”It’s creating the #WeAre movement and the song is really designed to get people to remember that there’s no you without me, there’s no me without you and remember that, at one point, we knew how close we were as human beings together on this planet,” says Dixon. “This first movement and this first song is about children, and the children that are caught up in our for-profit justice system.” Brandon Victor Dixon On Music & Philanthropy brandon-victor-dixon-jesus-christ-superstar-john-legend-we-are-new-single Brandon Victor Dixon On “Jesus Christ Superstar,” John Legend & “We Are” New Single Facebook Twitter Email Dixon speaks passionately about several different philanthropic efforts, including mass incarceration, gun control, LGBTQ issues, racial equality, and feminism. Music provides him with an avenue to reach people and advocate for these causes.”I started writing music over the last couple years, particularly when I was doing ‘Motown.’ I started to connect with people in the music industry, and Ryan Shaw, who played Stevie Wonder in that show, and I started working on some projects together,” says Dixon. “Then this year, coming off of ‘Hamilton’ and going into ‘Jesus Christ Superstar,’ I just felt it was time to start putting out some music.”Dixon’s “… Superstar” experience put him shoulder to shoulder onstage and in living rooms around the world with GRAMMY winners such as John Legend.”It was really awesome to see someone like John … voluntarily step out into a slightly more foreign territory and be just as dedicated and giving of himself and, beyond that, to stretch forward to drive himself into a new creative territory,” Dixon says. “You don’t see that in everybody who is established and comfortable with what they’ve built.”He was excited by all the wonderful work happening around him. John produced it, and he was very proud and excited about the overall project and the reaction to it.”Dixon’s breakout performances of “Heaven On Their Minds,” “Superstar” and “The Last Supper,” a pivotal confrontation with Legend, introduced him to a whole new audience. While he cites Sara Bareilles’ beautiful rendition of “I Don’t Know How To Love Him” as among his personal highlights, choosing his top moment of the night comes easy.”Coming out in a bedazzled tank top and silver jeans and singing ‘Superstar’ with a 36-piece band and 28 dancers around me is one of the dopest things I’ve ever had the opportunity to do,” says Dixon.The adrenaline rush of taking the stage was no doubt magnified by the performance being broadcast live on television. Though  Dixon’s initial approach to his role as Judas and the show was not unlike his prior work on Broadway, the live filming element added another layer of technical wrinkles.”We want everybody at home to feel what we’re doing live in the arena, and it seems like they really succeeded at that,” says Dixon. “The storytelling and the heart came through, and that’s largely because of the technical ability of the group we had around us.”The hard work was worth it, as the show Dixon calls “a permanent part of our cultural artistic fabric” made a huge splash with TV audiences, spurring a host of acclaim from critics and the public alike.”I think the best thing somebody said to me was, ‘The way you portrayed Judas and the way this production told the story, it makes me think about the world around me in a very different way,'” says Dixon. “That’s moving for me, because, for this show, you walk into it labeling Judas as a villain, and evil and bad, and the goal for me was to strive to make people feel differently about someone they thought they knew. And hopefully that will translate to the real world where you can think differently about people around you that you think you know … maybe even help you think a little differently about yourself.” News With so much under his belt already as an entertainer, it’s clear Dixon’s true purpose moving forward is all about enacting positive change, a daunting task for any artist. Naturally, maintaining a balance is also important.When he’s not onstage or in the studio, Dixon says he can be found playing pickup soccer in New York City or snagging a stack of comic books and a bag of Twizzlers to unwind. But he’s quick to assure us more music and videos are in the works, all aimed at showing the world we are one.”My message is very democratic, so hopefully that’s the spirit in which people will receive it and will feel happy to share it.”Catching Up On Music News Powered By The Recording Academy Just Got Easier. Have A Google Home Device? “Talk To GRAMMYs”Read morelast_img read more

Psychologists proved their value to political campaigns with one fundraising trick

first_img… In the last decade, psychological advisors have gone from an oddity to standard feature of major political campaigns. Back in 2008, when Barack Obama turned to a group of behavioral scientists to help him win the United States presidential election, their worth was yet unproven.  Little is known about the academic group, who were unpaid and rarely give interviews on their political work. But according to the New York Times, they included Princeton University’s Susan Fiske, University of Chicago’s Richard Thaler (who won the Nobel in 2017 for his work in behavioral economics), emeritus Arizona State University professor Robert Cialdini, and Michael Morris, a psychology and leadership professor at Columbia University. center_img Based on this psychologicalphenomenon, the behavioral science team suggested Obama should fundraise by offering the chance for one donor to win dinner with the Obamas, according to Morris. With an email list in the millions, the odds of winning for any one person would be tiny, but most people would struggle to fully appreciate that. “As soon as you have mentally pictured having dinner with Obama, then the event is mentally accessible to you and you give it a likelihood that’s higher than its real probability,” Morris said in an email. There was no massive barrier to entry; a 2012 New Yorker article on one such Obama raffle reported the suggested donation was just $3.  Read the whole story: Quartzlast_img read more