Video: James McClean’s brother – a defender – scores long-range beauty!

first_img1 James McClean has made 43 appearances for club and country this season The Premier League may be home to the McClean brothers in years to come if this strike is anything to go by. Republic of Ireland star James McClean has already impressed in the top flight with Sunderland and current club West Brom. The 26-year-old international has made 43 appearances for club and country this term, netting three goals.The winger – who has cost nearly £2million in transfer fees – has shown his ability on a number of occasions. Could his younger brother soon be following him to the English shores? Patrick McClean, 19, scored his first goal for Derry City at the weekend, in the League of Ireland Premier Division draw with Longford Town. His strike will certainly be a memorable one.McClean, a defender on as a substitute, received the ball just past the centre circle, controlling and rifling home from 40 yards – see below!last_img read more

SA sport’s fantastic fans

first_img20 May 2004Fans are the lifeblood of the sporting industry. Without them, a sizeable chunk of the world’s media would be out of a job, outdoor advertising would be restricted to bus stops, and sponsorships would not have been invented.For many South Africans, supporting, playing, living, breathing sport is simply the way things are. It is how they are meant to be. And they wouldn’t want it any other way.Many years ago, I read an interesting book by James Michener. Not a novel the size of a brick, which is what most people think he produces, it was called simply “Michener on Sport”. A true fan of sport, Michener named just three countries as being absolutely fanatical about sport: the then East Germany, Australia, and South Africa.The fans and the flagToday’s South African sports fans are easily spotted – the flag “new” South African catches the eye at sporting events around the world. And with face-painting so much in vogue, it is common to see the six colours leaping out from cheering South African faces.The ubiquitous flags are popular items on sale at big matches, along other regalia. Supporters’ kit and memorabilia are big business in South Africa, and soccer’s Bafana Bafana, rugby’s Springboks, and cricket’s Proteas sell huge numbers of shirts.South African sports fans love a winner, but they can be extremely critical of failure, and the chorus of disquiet when things are not going well can become quite deafening.However, despite dire predictions, and ceaseless complaints, South African sports fans continue to support their teams. Even when national support is not an issue, South Africans are true sport lovers at heart. Want to use this article in your publication or on your website?See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

Action Taken to Abolish Whipping

first_imgGovernment has taken steps to abolish whipping as a penalty for certain criminal offences, with the tabling of several legislations in the Senate, on November 16. The Bills, which were tabled by Minister of Justice, Senator the Hon. Mark Golding, will support Jamaica’s adherence to modern trends in human rights jurisprudence in relation to corporal punishment. To this end, the Larceny (Amendment) Act 2012; the Law Reform (Flogging and Whipping) (Abolition) Act, 2012 and the Obeah (Amendment) Act 2012 were tabled. All three Bills, when passed, will repeal the Crime Prevention Act and the Flogging Regulation Act. Cabinet gave approval for the tabling of the legislations to abolish the judicial imposition of corporal punishment in the form of flogging and whipping. This move will support the Government’s commitment against torture and international protocols against human rights violation.last_img read more