Focus on Atlanta: A nightmare reunion awaits Shanahan, Falcons

first_imgFirst came the 49ers’ crushing injury news, next will come the inevitable questions this week about how he helped the Falcons blow a Super Bowl title nearly three years ago.Kyle Shanahan sure didn’t get much time to savor a 49ers’ victory for the ages in New Orleans on Sunday.As the play-caller for the Falcons, Shanahan had a hand in the worst collapse in NFL history when Atlanta blew a 25-point second-half lead against the Patriots in Super Bowl LI.“I’ll go back through every play for the …last_img

OABA 2019 winners announced

first_imgShare Facebook Twitter Google + LinkedIn Pinterest The Ohio AgriBusiness Association is pleased to announce the recipients of the 2020 Industry Excellence Awards. They are: 2020 Excellence in Customer Service – Charles Hebble, Mid-Wood, Inc.; 2020 Achievement as an Emerging Leader – Karie Staley, Central Ohio Farmers Co-op, Inc.; and 2020 Excellence in Safety & Stewardship – Cindy Ridzon, Witmer’s Feed & Grain, Inc. Award recipients will be recognized at the 2020 OABA Industry Conference on Jan. 30. Winners will receive a plaque and $1,000 cash award, sponsored by ABIS/J.H. Ward Agency.OABA has a distinguished history of serving the agricultural industry and its members through advocacy, policy leadership and educational programs. The Industry Excellence Awards honor excellence, professionalism and achievement among OABA member companies and their employees, and thereby encourage that same excellence in others.“It is a great honor to recognize outstanding individuals in our industry,” said Chris Henney, OABA president and CEO. “These leaders set a high standard that agribusiness employees across all levels should aspire to achieve.”Excellence in Customer ServiceThe Excellence in Customer Service Award is presented to an individual who goes “above and beyond” in their service to customers, in order to define what excellent customer service looks like and recognize those whose contributions may often go unnoticed. The 2020 award recipient is Charles Hebble of Shelby, Ohio.Hebble, Crop Specialist at Mid-Wood, Inc., makes seed, crop nutrient and crop protection recommendations for grower customers in Central Ohio. His customer-first attitude drives his daily interactions at work, whether it is scouting fields and reporting back to customers, delivering needed supplies outside regular business hours, or periodically calling to check on overwhelmed farmers.“His relationship with the farmer customer is very important to him,” said Ed Miller, vice president of agronomy at Mid-Wood. “This guy goes the extra mile, it doesn’t matter if it’s one acre or ten thousand acres, he cares about every single acre, every single customer.”Achievement as an Emerging LeaderThe Achievement as an Emerging Leader Award is presented to an individual who represents the spirit of leadership as a growing agribusiness professional. Leadership is often difficult to define in everyday business activities, but it remains an important ability to cultivate. The 2020 award recipient is Karie Staley of Mount Gilead, Ohio.Staley, recently promoted to Branch Manager of Central Ohio Farmers Co-op’s Mount Gilead facility, now oversees all aspects of the facility’s operations, expanding her role and responsibilities after more than 20 years on COFC’s agronomy staff. Staley continually demonstrates a servant leader approach, putting the needs of the organization, her employees and customers above her own.“The primary thing that makes Karie stand out is her relationship with the customers,” said Scott Crowder, President & CEO of Central Ohio Farmers Co-op. “The way that they trust her, they know that the guidance she’s going to give them will make them successful. And that’s what we’re all about: making our members and farmers successful.”Excellence in Safety & StewardshipThe Excellence in Safety & Stewardship Award is presented to an individual that demonstrates safety and stewardship in day-to-day activities and interactions with customers, encouraging others to put safety first and be good stewards of equipment and land. The 2020 award recipient is Cindy Ridzon of New Waterford, Ohio.Ridzon, Office Manager and Safety Coordinator for Witmer’s Feed & Grain, Inc., oversees office functions, develops and maintains safety policies and procedures, and ensures Witmer’s stays in regulatory compliance. Ridzon empowers employees to make safety their number one priority every day and encourages them to identify and address any safety risks before they cause an issue.“Cindy’s concern for the safety and well-being of employees is authentic,” said Jeff Carr, Controller at Witmer’s Feed & Grain. “She’s been paramount in establishing a safety-minded culture here at Witmer’s. It empowers everyone here personally to take ownership of that safety-mindedness, knowing that safety is first and foremost.”2020 OABA Industry ConferenceThe three-day Industry Conference event, Jan. 29-31 at the Columbus Renaissance Westerville, is packed with widely-respected speakers and industry professionals, sharing their expertise on a variety of topics relating to agronomy, grain and feed, safety and more. More details will be made available at www.oaba.net/events_conference.last_img read more

How to Create Vector Fire in After Effects

first_imgThat covers the basic flame shape, but if you look at the DreamWorks example, you’ll notice that the edges are oval, not circles. To recreate this, drop your “Flame” comp into a new comp (I called mine “Flame Stretch”), then stretch the “Flame” layer to be taller vertically and skinnier horizontally. Building the FireTo create the whole fire, you’ll be making duplicates of the flame with different colors,  and scaling/moving them around. For each duplicate you make, offset the timing of the layer to make sure it’s not showing the exact same frame as any other instance. Create a new comp (I named it “Vector Fire”) and drop the “Flame Stretch” comp into it. For the color, add a Gradient Ramp effect, and set it to yellow at the top of the flame and reddish orange at the bottom. Duplicate it and scale/move it to create a larger base.Gradient for the base flame:First instance of the flame:Two instances of the flame for the base. Don’t forget to offset the time of the second layer:Duplicate it again a couple times and change the colors of these to a white-to-yellow gradient. These will be smaller and form the brighter middle of the fire, so move/scale them to create that look.Gradient colors for the top/middle flames:First “small” flame:Another “small flame” instance:Last, we’ll need an in-between, so duplicate one of the orange base flames a few times and swap the gradient colors using the “Swap Colors” button. Use these new ones to create a mid-sized section of the fire behind the lighter/smaller flames.First “middle” flame instance:Another “middle” flame on the right:A third “middle” flame to fill in the right side:Scales and positions for the above:There you go! That’s how to make vector fire!This method uses nested comps, so most of the “physics” don’t apply of the bat, but if you don’t mind slower render times, you can turn on the “Collapse Transformations” switches and use a few parented nulls to get your physics back. On the other hand, if you don’t mind not having physics but want better render times, try pre-rendering the basic flame shape to a codec like ProRes 444 with an alpha, then do the coloring and duplicating for the full fire using the new .mov file. Create awesome vector fire in After Effects using Trapcode Particular!For a recent client project, I was asked to do a motion graphics video that was fire themed. In general, realistic fire effects are crazy hard to pull off well, so I started looking for a different approach. Most of the design collateral for the client revolved around a vector/illustrated look, so I decided to do some searching and experimentation around a “vector fire” theme.After a short Google session, I ran across a great example of exactly what I wanted to create:Sadly, they didn’t include a tutorial for how to create this look, so I took what hints I could from the comments and got to work experimenting, and ended up with this:It’s not exactly what’s in the original example – I modified its look to match my needs, so you’ll notice some key differences, like no little embers/sparks, and it goes straight up, not at an angle. That said, it’s not too hard to create. Here’s how:Building the Flame in After EffectsTo start with, create a new comp at a pretty big size: 1500 x 2500. We want a vector look, so a large size will give it the super-sharp feel of a vector.Next, create a new solid, name it “Flame”, and apply an instance of Trapcode Particular (the best particle emitter for AE, hands down). We’ll start by getting the particles to look right. Crank the size up to 80 and drop the sphere feather down to 0. Now we’ve got nice, large, sharp circles to work with.Change the emitter type to “Box”, and set its emission direction to “Directional.” Now, move the base of the emitter to below the bottom of the comp and make the emitter much wider on the X-axis (around 1200 or so worked for me) then adjust the velocity to somewhere around 900. You’ll probably notice that, by default, “Directional” emitters throw particles away from the comp into Z-space, so rotate the emitter by 40º on the X axis to get it going more vertically, but still tapering off a little towards the top.center_img Set the emitter to start below the bottom of the comp:Now that the emitter is shooting particles in the right direction, we’ll want to get the emission and velocity settings down to create the base shape. We want to have basically a solid interior, with a little bit of randomness on the edges. To get the solid interior, crank the particles/sec up to 600, then set the direction spread to 10 to control some of the randomness of the edges; we don’t really want any huge pieces outside the main shape on their own. Last, set the life to 6 and the life random to 20, which will get us a taller flame with a nicely random tip.The base of the flame:Now that we’ve got the base shape down, what we want to do is create a wide, less dense emitter to cut off the right and left sides of the base to make it look like fire. We’re going to duplicate the Particular layer and change a few things. Place the new layer on top and name it, “Left Obscure.” Set the blend mode to “Silhouette Alpha,” which will cut the alpha of that layer out of anything below it.We’ll pull the size down a little to 70, but we’ll also crank the size random up to 60 so that we get some really huge ones and some much smaller ones. We’ll also set the life random to 50 to make things a little more sparse. For the emitter itself, we’ll want half the number of particles (so around 300) and a much larger direction spread of 30 to give us some great randomness.At this point it’s going to look really huge, and we only need it to obscure the edge of the whit emitter, so we can shrink the emitter’s X-axis size down to 200. Now we’ve got it the right shape, so we’ll move it to the left and rotate it on the Y-axis to -8, with the end goal of cutting off the left side of the base emitter at an angle.Set the emitter to come from the bottom left:Left side obscured:That’s one side done, so next we’ll duplicate the “Left Obscure” layer and rename it “Right Obscure.” Move it to the right and change the Y rotation to the opposite of the left side (8). Move the emitter to the bottom right:A nice looking flame:At this point, you may decide that you want a “bottom” instead of a hard cut-off (I did in my case), so you can increase the comp’s size to 1500×3000 if you’d like, and do the same for the base layer (you can leave the obscure layers as-is if you’d like. You’ll make a new obscure layer that overlaps them, so they’re fine as they are). To make a bottom, duplicate your base layer and rename it “Bottom Obscure.” We’re duplicating the base layer and not an obscure layer because we want the bottom to be more controlled. Don’t forget to set its blend mode to “Silhouette Alpha” so that it cuts away like the other “Obscure” layers.Move the emitter to the bottom left corner and change it’s rotation to 90º on the X-axis and around 100º on the Y-axis. It should be placed so that it completely covers the bottom. Next, twirl down Physics => Air => Spherical Field settings (it might help to have “Visualize Fields” on for this next part). What we want to do is create a sphere that pushes the particles away from the base of the flame to create a round “bottom.” Set the strength to around 80 (positive numbers repel, negative numbers attract) and the radius to fit the size of your flame’s base (600 for me). This should make a nice looking flame bottom for you. Don’t forget to turn off “Visualize Fields” before proceeding.last_img read more