NBA free agency rumors: Al Horford declines Celtics option, hopes to work out new deal

first_imgBoston Celtics center Al Horford will not exercise the $30.1M option on his 2019-20 contract and become an unrestricted free agent, league sources tell ESPN. Horford and the Celtics both have interest in working toward a new deal in July, sources tell ESPN.— Adrian Wojnarowski (@wojespn) June 18, 2019Horford, 33, is coming off of a season in which he averaged 13.6 points and 6.7 rebounds while shooting 53.5 percent from the floor and 36.0 percent from beyond the arc.He is starting to get older and the team may want to restructure his deal so it can have more flexibility in free agency. Related News NBA free agency rumors: Kings prioritizing center, but unlikely to pursue Nikola Vucevic Al Horford and the Celtics want to extend their relationship.Boston’s center will decline his $30.1 million option this offseason and become an unrestricted free agent, but he is doing so in hopes of working out a new deal with the Celtics, according to ESPN. However, Rozier reportedly is open to returning if Irving doesn’t, so the Celtics likely will need a little bit more money to re-sign the guard.If Horford takes a pay cut then Rozier would likely be able to get his money.The Celtics currently are $16 million over the salary cap, according to Spotrac, but if Irving (option figure: $21.3 million) leaves then they would have some money to spend, especially if Horford agrees to a more team-friendly deal.center_img Kyrie Irving is expected to decline his option as well and hit the open market with the Nets the reported favorite to land the guard in free agency.Jaylen Brown, Marcus Smart and Jayson Tatum are expected to remain in Boston, but players such as Marcus Morris and Terry Rozier could find themselves with new teams. NBA free agency: Patrick Beverley says he’s open to signing with Bullslast_img read more

Reprint: Even in Wellington the events of 9/11 was an incredible moment in history

first_imgThe following is a commentary I wrote two years ago about the day I spent at the Wellington Daily News office on Sept. 11, 2001.Commentary from 2011 by Tracy McCue, Sumner Newscow — Granted you all are probably tiring of yet another rehash of 9/11 — that terrible day 10 years ago.But we do all have a story to tell. Here’s mine.On that morning I was a news editor for the Wellington Daily News working beside Linda Stinnett, Brady Walker, and a slew of hard working Wellington people putting out the news of the day. The paper – still a five days a week publication – had just been bought out by corporate and our printing press had just been disassembled and our paper was printed in El Dorado. Our deadline was at 9:30 a.m.For some reason, the front page was done that morning which was a miracle in itself. Making deadlines was not a WDN strength and corporate was not too shy in telling us about this fault and how it needed to be rectified quickly. We were featuring a story on a military type exercise that was being conducted in Sumner County, I can’t remember the specifics. It was our usual day of mayhem. It was football season and the Wellington paper had just finished celebrating its 100th anniversary the week before.I was quite pleased with my deadline making that morning.We were still on the Associated Press wire service and it made this ring every time a big story came in. Like the WDN, AP hadn’t quite gotten the hang of this nifty little tool called the Internet. The bell rang just as I was about to print the front page. Linda looked over the piece of paper AP was churning out and she told me a plane had just hit the twin towers.My first reaction? Whatever. We decided to print more pages. New York was not Wellington. Nobody here cares.It was about 15 minutes later, and we were about to hit the road to El Dorado, when we heard the AP bell ring again. Linda looked at it again and said, there was a second plane hitting the twin towers. I looked at her, gave her the middle finger and went back to doing what I was doing. Linda always liked to joke and push my buttons.“No, I’m serious,” she said. About that time managing editor Terry Craig ran into the building with a newly purchased television from the nearby downtown Radio Shack. That was unusual, because for the last couple of years we had been pleading with Craig to get a TV for this office. Suddenly we had one.“We’ve got to redo the front page,” Craig said and proceeded upstairs.Now the A.P. wire was going nuts and suddenly I was in a panic. This was big. But we needed to send the paper out. Do we wait or do we go?With each A.P. ring, there was more news that seemed incredibly surreal. The next story had something about a plane hitting the Pentagon. Another came a bit later that said a plane was down in Pennsylvania. My first urge was to just leave and watch what the hell was happening on Terry’s newly purchased television.The dilemma now wasn’t whether to redo the front page, but when to do it. The news was changing by the second. Yet, even in this chaos, we still had a deadline.Linda and I finally decided we would run the next A.P. story coming off the wire and move all local content down to the bottom of the fold. Had I known then that we had free access to photos, we’d have thrown out the local content completely. I wrote the biggest headline of my career with the one word, “Attack!” The story contained bits and pieces of the 9/11 attack. The towers hadn’t fallen yet.We sent our paper up around 10:30, an hour late. I knew I was going to be in trouble. I was wrong. All of our sister papers were late as well. This wasn’t a normal day.Then the A.P. wire, which had been going nuts all morning, suddenly went silent. A.P. was stationed in New York City. Noise is a by-product of the newspaper business. Ironically, silence is the loudest sound of all. At that moment, it hit me. This was, perhaps, the news story of my lifetime.I’d like to say I was scared and heartbroken and mad and all those emotions that you are supposed to have.But truthfully, I’m a journalist. Big stories get your heart pumping. I couldn’t wait to see what would happen next and how the town of Wellington was going to react.The rest of the day was interesting. I remember doing an interview with local financial expert J.P. Buellesfeld and how he was already accurately forecasting what was going to happen to the economy thereafter.The panic didn’t really set in Wellington until later in the day when suddenly people were rushing to the local gas stations to fill up their cars and auxiliary gas cans over fear that the town itself was under a nuclear attack. I’ll never forget how long the line to Speedy’s gas station was: going clear back to Penny’s Diner. I have one picture of an old man with 10 5-gallon gas cans he was filling and putting in the trunk of his car. His facial expression was that of: “The Nazis were coming and he needed to get out, now!”Like everyone around me, I didn’t know what to expect next over the coming weeks. Corporate sent us a memo that we could break deadline if another attack was coming. But only because of that!To this day, I wonder if I’ll ever witness such an event that affected so many lives in so many ways.I sincerely hope not. But if I have to, I hope I’m still in journalism. Close Forgot password? Please put in your email: Send me my password! Close message Login This blog post All blog posts Subscribe to this blog post’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Subscribe to this blog’s comments through… RSS Feed Subscribe via email Subscribe Follow the discussion Comments (6) Logging you in… Close Login to IntenseDebate Or create an account Username or Email: Password: Forgot login? Cancel Login Close WordPress.com Username or Email: Password: Lost your password? Cancel Login Dashboard | Edit profile | Logout Logged in as Admin Options Disable comments for this page Save Settings Sort by: Date Rating Last Activity Loading comments… You are about to flag this comment as being inappropriate. Please explain why you are flagging this comment in the text box below and submit your report. The blog admin will be notified. Thank you for your input. -5 Vote up Vote down America · 361 weeks ago Tracy as a reporter you need to know when dates. Important dates at that. 9/11 happened 12 years ago. This is a sad day for all Americans. Most remeber watching the tv. I remember watching tv in the elementry school library. Everyone was in tears and panic. We were to little, but we knew something very bad happened. Now that we are in college and we are seeing what war was and seeing the young men and women going out to war older then us and also our age. Thank you for serving our great nation. Report Reply 1 reply · active 361 weeks ago +4 Vote up Vote down K-State Mom · 361 weeks ago If you read the beginning of the article, he wrote it 2 years ago. Report Reply +2 Vote up Vote down Tired of Idiots · 361 weeks ago 1. There is a spell check 2. Unfortunately there is not a grammar check or stupidity check for people who continuously feel the need to leave meaningless comments to these stories that are only written in an attempt to make the columnist look stupid but, in fact, do just the opposite and make the commentor look like an idiot. Remeber the saying “Think before you speak”? Maybe everyone should also “Think before they type” and an occassional proof-read might not be a bad idea either. Report Reply 0 replies · active 361 weeks ago -1 Vote up Vote down guest · 361 weeks ago Tired of Idiots: “Remeber the saying”… Also, it’s “think before you speak?”, not “Think before you speak”? The word think in the phrase “think before they type” should not be capitalized. Report Reply 1 reply · active 361 weeks ago 0 Vote up Vote down Tired of Idiots · 361 weeks ago Thanks for that… Report Reply +2 Vote up Vote down WHSFAN · 361 weeks ago I just love all the grammer experts that comment…makes me laugh! Thank you for making me smile today as the three above tear each other down. Report Reply 0 replies · active 361 weeks ago Post a new comment Enter text right here! Comment as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new comments Comments by IntenseDebate Enter text right here! Reply as a Guest, or login: Login to IntenseDebate Login to WordPress.com Login to Twitter Go back Tweet this comment Connected as (Logout) Email (optional) Not displayed publicly. Name Email Website (optional) Displayed next to your comments. Not displayed publicly. If you have a website, link to it here. Posting anonymously. Tweet this comment Cancel Submit Comment Subscribe to None Replies All new commentslast_img read more